What do Washington’s politicians and pro-wrestlers have in common? They are mostly overweight white guys pretending to hurt each other. 

 – Unknown

Essential Questions


  1. What are the formal and informal powers of the Congress of the United States?
  2. What functions do does the congress perform?
  3. What powers are exclusive to the Congress and what powers does it share?
  4. What are the ties between political parties, interest groups, the media, and state and local government and Congress?
  5. What are the formal and informal powers of the Presidency of the United States?
  6. What functions do does the President perform?
  7. What powers are exclusive to the President and what powers does it share?
  8. What are the ties between political parties, interest groups, the media, and state and local government and the President?
  9. What are the formal and informal powers of the Bureaucracy?
  10. What functions do does the Bureaucracy perform?
  11. What powers are exclusive to the Bureaucracy and what powers does it share?
  12. What are the ties between political parties, interest groups, the media, and state and local government and the Bureaucracy?
  13. What functions do the judiciary perform and well?
  14. What powers are exclusive to the judiciary as well as which powers does it share?

Identifications


CHAPTER 13

  1. Attitudinal view of Representation
  2. Caucus (congressional)
  3. Christmas tree bill
  4. Committee of the whole
  5. Closed rule
  6. Cloture rule (rule 22)
  7. Concurrent resolution
  8. Conference committee
  9. Congress
  10. Congressional Budget Office
  11. Congressional Research Office
  12. Conservative coalition
  13. Descriptive representation
  14. Discharge petition
  15. Division rule
  16. Double-tracking
  17. Fast-tracking
  18. Filibuster
  19. General Accounting Office
  20. Honoraria
  21. Joint Committee
  22. Joint Resolution
  23. Majority Leader
  24. Majority-Minority District
  25. Marginal District
  26. Mark-up
  27. Minority leader
  28. Multiple referrals

Chapter 13, cont.

  1. Open rule
  2. Organizational view of representation
  3. Party vote
  4. Pork-barrel legislation
  5. President pro-tempore
  6. Private bill
  7. Public bill
  8. Quorum call
  9. Representational view of representation
  10. Restrictive rule
  11. Rider
  12. Roll-call vote
  13. Rules committee
  14. Senatorial courtesy
  15. Seventh Amendment
  16. Simple resolution
  17. Speaker of the House
  18. Standing committees
  19. Substantive representation
  20. Teller vote
  21. Voice vote
  22. Whip

Chapter 14

  1. Ad hoc structure
  2. Budget Reform Act of 1974
  3. Cabinet
  4. Circular structure
  5. Executive agencies
  6. Executive office of the president
  7. Executive privilege
  8. Impeachment
  9. Impoundment
  10. Independent agencies
  11. Inherent powers
  12. Lame duck
  13. Legislative veto
  14. Office of Management and Budget
  15. Perks
  16. Pocket veto
  17. Presidential coattails
  18. Prime minister
  19. Pyramid structure
  20. Recessions
  21. Representative democracy
  22. Signing statement
  23. Twenty-fifth amendment
  24. Twenty-second amendment
  25. Unified government
  26. Veto message
  27. White House Office

Chapter 15

  1. Administrative procedure act
  2. Annual authorization
  3. Appropriation
  4. Authorization legislation
  5. Buddy system
  6. Bureaucracy
  7. Committee clearance
  8. Competitive service
  9. Discretionary Authority
  10. Duplication
  11. Federal Employees Political Activities Act
  12. Freedom of Information Act
  13. Hatch Act
  14. Interagency Council
  15. Iron Triangle
  16. Issue Networks
  17. Legislative veto
  18. Name-request job
  19. National Environmental policy
  20. Non-career executive assignments
  21. Open meeting law
  22. Oversight
  23. Patronage
  24. Pendleton Act
  25. Privacy Act
  26. Red tape
  27. Schedule C Job
  28. Senior executive service
  29. trust fund
  30. Waste
  31. Whistleblower Protection Act

Chapter 16

  1. Activist approach
  2. Amicus curiae
  3. Appellate courts
  4. Brief
  5. Civil law
  6. Class-action suite
  7. Concurring opinion
  8. Constitutional court
  9. Court of appeals
  10. Criminal law
  11. Dissenting opinion
  12. District court
  13. Diversity cases
  14. Federal-question cases
  15. Fee shifting
  16. In forma pauperis
  17. Judicial activism
  18. Judicial implementation
  19. Judicial restraint
  20. Judicial review
  21. Judiciary Act of 1789
  22. Jurisdiction
  23. Legislative courts
  24. Litmus test
  25. Marbury v. Madison (1807)
  26. Opinion of the Court
  27. Original jurisdiction
  28. Per curium opinion
  29. Plaintiff
  30. Political question case
  31. Precedent
  32. Remedy
  33. Rule of four
  34. Senatorial courtesy
  35. Solicitor general
  36. Sovereign immunity
  37. Standing (legal)
  38. Stare decisis
  39. Strict-constructionist approach
  40. Trial courts
  41. Writ of certiori

Civic Engagement Project – Task #3


The purpose of Task 3 is for students to both analyze civil liberties or civil rights issues underlying their policy problem and to analyze how interpretations of civil liberties protect and limit interest groups as they seek to influence domestic policy. For this task, students will submit a written report that:

  1. Explains the relationship between your interest groups policy problem and civil liberties, and as appropriate, identifies the specific provisions in the Bill of Rights that relate to your policy problem and explains how these provisions are related to your policy problem.
  2. Explains the relationship between your policy problem and civil rights.
  3. Explains how at least ONE Supreme Court case related to civil liberties or civil rights protects or enhances your interest’s group’s ability to influence policy.
  4. Explains how at least ONE Supreme Court case related to civil liberties or civil rights limits your interest group’s ability to influence policy.
  5. Describe at least ONE lesson, strategy, or idea your interest group can borrow from “Letter from a Birmingham Jail,” the National Organization for Women, or the pro-life movement in terms of how to successfully influence government policy.
Sub Units

The Legislative Branch

The Executive Branch

The Judicial Branch

Unit Review